Discussion:
IRTS HAREC Exam - last call
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Spike
2017-06-05 09:45:57 UTC
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From the IRTS Radio News Bulletin Sunday 4th June 2017
Amateur Station Licence Examination
__________________________________________________________________
I> Intending examination candidates are asked to note that Monday 12th
June is the final date for receipt of applications to sit the next
amateur station Licence Examination which will be held on Thursday 29th
June in the ComReg offices in Dublin.
A large number of applications have already been received and as
numbers are limited and examination places are allocated on a first
come first served basis, those intending to sit the examination should
apply immediately. Full details, including entry procedure, examination
fee and how to pay the fee on line are available at www.irts.ie/exam
Please note that it is necessary to download the application form from
the web page and forward the completed form and the appropriate fee so
as to secure a place for the examination.
It is also important to note that even if you pay the fee on-line you
must still complete and forward the application form. Remember, the
closing date for receipt of completed applications is Monday 12th June
__________________________________________________________________
=====

The IRTS HAREC exam has it all: far less bureaucracy than the UK, no
construction projects, no books to buy, prospective candidates can study
at home, one single exam of 60 questions. Take the club-based
5wpm and get a swanky two-letter EI call.

OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM

This involves pre-booking a place for the Irish ComReg exam, held twice
a year in Dublin (but see below). Note that this is a HAREC exam, and
not specifically an exam for an Irish licence. These usually take place
in April/June and October/December. Places are limited so making a
booking as early as possible is advisable. However, the IRTS web site
notes that "The examination is usually held in the ComReg Offices in
Dublin but, where the numbers warrant it, examinations can be held at
other centres". The exam fee is 50 euro (concessions are 25 euro), and much
useful exam-related material is available from IRTS. A sample
60-question, two-hour paper is also available on the IRTS web site by
following the links:

See http://www.irts.ie/exam for details about the exam, how to enter plus
links to the syllabus, course guide and other study material.

A HAREC will be awarded on the strength of a pass (60 percent correct
answers in each of the two sections), which can then be used to obtain a
UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence under the HAREC arrangement. Many other
countries belong to the HAREC scheme.

There is no accompanying compulsory Morse test or Morse Appreciation, and no
projects or construction work is required. Note that if you want a
two-letter (CEPT Class 1) EI call (see below), a pass in a club-based
5wpm Morse test is necessary.


TRAVELLING & COSTS

You will need to appear at the ComReg offices in Dublin at the
appropriate time, and there will be costs associated with that. Perhaps
the easiest and most direct route is to fly to Dublin; you will need to
cost travel from your nearest suitable airport, and determine the airfare.
For example, London Heathrow to Dublin can cost in the region of GBPS 89 at
for a pre-booked flight at about 0930, but this can be reduced by
travelling earlier in the day, travelling from a local airport, or not
taking up flight extras that add to the cost.

From Dublin, you will need to travel to the city centre. This is well
organised, fast, and inexpensive. Dublin Bus offers an express AirLink
service (route 747) every 10 minutes at peak times to the city centre
and bus station for 6 euro single or 10 euro return (but check for
latest fares). This service uses the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid the
city traffic and can
reach the city centre in minutes.

Dublin city centre has many restaurants and places to eat where suitable
refreshments can be purchased.

Another possible route is to travel to Belfast, stay overnight, and
travel by train to Dublin. This has not been costed, but would have the
advantage of breaking the journey into two parts. Belfast is a very
modern city and has a lively group of Amateurs who would doubtless make
you welcome.


NOTES

[] One does not need to be a resident or have an address in the Irish
Republic in order to be awarded an EI licence.
[] All EI licences grant full privileges, and enables operation outside
EI/UK under CEPT or other reciprocal arrangements.
[] EI does not issue any subsets of its main licence in the manner of
the UK.
[] The lifetime EI licence has a once-only cost of 125 euro (circa GBPS
100), and needs to be revalidated (free) every five years. Any postal
address is acceptable for this.

[] A UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence has some limitations, such as not
qualifying for operating either /MM or abroad under CEPT, the
supervision of a non-licensed person operating one's station, holding a
club licence, or (possibly, clarification sought)) obtaining a
reciprocal licence under a UK/foreign agreement where HARECs are not
accepted (see below). For everyday use within the UK it is
indistinguishable over the air from any other Full licence. Some of
these limitations can be avoided by taking out an EI call. About 700 UK
Full (Reciprocal) licenses are currently issue.

The HAREC/CEPT/Reciprocal arrangements are not necessarily clear or
straightforward in all cases, but the thrust of this document is the
issue of a UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence. Anyone wishing to use such
arrangements will need to determine the details for their particular
country of operation, or check whether such use would fall under the
purview of an EI licence.


FINALLY

The UK Full (Reciprocal) licence is indistinguishable from any other UK
Full licence over the air. Do the 5wpm in Eire and get a swanky
two-letter Irish call as well. It's also a licence for life. Validation
is every five years to any postal address in the world.

Any individual intending to take advantage of this route should
determine for themselves whether it is appropriate for their own needs,
what the likely costs will be for their particular situation, and the
suitability of the Full (Reciprocal) Licence for their particular
circumstances.

=====
--
Spike
Brian Reay
2017-06-05 10:09:15 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Spike
From the IRTS Radio News Bulletin Sunday 4th June 2017
Amateur Station Licence Examination
__________________________________________________________________
I> Intending examination candidates are asked to note that Monday 12th
June is the final date for receipt of applications to sit the next
amateur station Licence Examination which will be held on Thursday 29th
June in the ComReg offices in Dublin.
A large number of applications have already been received and as
numbers are limited and examination places are allocated on a first
come first served basis, those intending to sit the examination should
apply immediately. Full details, including entry procedure, examination
fee and how to pay the fee on line are available at
www.irts.ie/exam Please note that it is necessary to download the
application form from
the web page and forward the completed form and the appropriate fee so
as to secure a place for the examination.
It is also important to note that even if you pay the fee on-line you
must still complete and forward the application form. Remember, the
closing date for receipt of completed applications is Monday 12th June
__________________________________________________________________
=====
The IRTS HAREC exam has it all: far less bureaucracy than the UK, no
construction projects, no books to buy, prospective candidates can study
at home, one single exam of 60 questions. Take the club-based
5wpm and get a swanky two-letter EI call.
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
This involves pre-booking a place for the Irish ComReg exam, held twice
a year in Dublin (but see below). Note that this is a HAREC exam, and
not specifically an exam for an Irish licence. These usually take place
in April/June and October/December. Places are limited so making a
booking as early as possible is advisable. However, the IRTS web site
notes that "The examination is usually held in the ComReg Offices in
Dublin but, where the numbers warrant it, examinations can be held at
other centres". The exam fee is 50 euro (concessions are 25 euro), and much
useful exam-related material is available from IRTS. A sample
60-question, two-hour paper is also available on the IRTS web site by
See http://www.irts.ie/exam for details about the exam, how to enter plus
links to the syllabus, course guide and other study material.
A HAREC will be awarded on the strength of a pass (60 percent correct
answers in each of the two sections), which can then be used to obtain a
UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence under the HAREC arrangement. Many other
countries belong to the HAREC scheme.
There is no accompanying compulsory Morse test or Morse Appreciation, and no
projects or construction work is required. Note that if you want a
two-letter (CEPT Class 1) EI call (see below), a pass in a club-based
5wpm Morse test is necessary.
TRAVELLING & COSTS
You will need to appear at the ComReg offices in Dublin at the
appropriate time, and there will be costs associated with that. Perhaps
the easiest and most direct route is to fly to Dublin; you will need to
cost travel from your nearest suitable airport, and determine the airfare.
For example, London Heathrow to Dublin can cost in the region of GBPS 89 at
for a pre-booked flight at about 0930, but this can be reduced by
travelling earlier in the day, travelling from a local airport, or not
taking up flight extras that add to the cost.
From Dublin, you will need to travel to the city centre. This is well
organised, fast, and inexpensive. Dublin Bus offers an express AirLink
service (route 747) every 10 minutes at peak times to the city centre
and bus station for 6 euro single or 10 euro return (but check for
latest fares). This service uses the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid the
city traffic and can
reach the city centre in minutes.
Dublin city centre has many restaurants and places to eat where suitable
refreshments can be purchased.
Another possible route is to travel to Belfast, stay overnight, and
travel by train to Dublin. This has not been costed, but would have the
advantage of breaking the journey into two parts. Belfast is a very
modern city and has a lively group of Amateurs who would doubtless make
you welcome.
NOTES
[] One does not need to be a resident or have an address in the Irish
Republic in order to be awarded an EI licence.
[] All EI licences grant full privileges, and enables operation outside
EI/UK under CEPT or other reciprocal arrangements.
[] EI does not issue any subsets of its main licence in the manner of
the UK.
[] The lifetime EI licence has a once-only cost of 125 euro (circa GBPS
100), and needs to be revalidated (free) every five years. Any postal
address is acceptable for this.
[] A UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence has some limitations, such as not
qualifying for operating either /MM or abroad under CEPT, the
supervision of a non-licensed person operating one's station, holding a
club licence, or (possibly, clarification sought)) obtaining a
reciprocal licence under a UK/foreign agreement where HARECs are not
accepted (see below). For everyday use within the UK it is
indistinguishable over the air from any other Full licence. Some of
these limitations can be avoided by taking out an EI call. About 700 UK
Full (Reciprocal) licenses are currently issue.
The HAREC/CEPT/Reciprocal arrangements are not necessarily clear or
straightforward in all cases, but the thrust of this document is the
issue of a UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence. Anyone wishing to use such
arrangements will need to determine the details for their particular
country of operation, or check whether such use would fall under the
purview of an EI licence.
FINALLY
The UK Full (Reciprocal) licence is indistinguishable from any other UK
Full licence over the air. Do the 5wpm in Eire and get a swanky
two-letter Irish call as well. It's also a licence for life. Validation
is every five years to any postal address in the world.
Any individual intending to take advantage of this route should
determine for themselves whether it is appropriate for their own needs,
what the likely costs will be for their particular situation, and the
suitability of the Full (Reciprocal) Licence for their particular
circumstances.
=====
Spike, if someone really wanted to circumvent the UK exam system, they
could far more easily take the US exams in the UK, without incurring the
expense of travelling to Ireland, and still obtain the same UK
reciprocal licence. Plus, the US exam fee is only about £10. The US
licence (or license I should say) is free and they can choose a
callsign. Many US amateurs are willing to provide the required US
mailing address.

Of course, most people are happy to go through the UK system and get a
proper UK Full licence. Some do go one to obtain other licences for use
when travelling, either by using their UK HAREC or taking the relevant
overseas exams (eg the US ones). Not every one thinks like you and feels
the need to circumvent the system.
A. non Eyemouse
2017-06-05 10:58:48 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Brian Reay
Spike, if someone really wanted to circumvent the UK exam system, they
could far more easily take the US exams in the UK, without incurring the
expense of travelling to Ireland, and still obtain the same UK
reciprocal licence. Plus, the US exam fee is only about £10. The US
licence (or license I should say) is free and they can choose a
callsign. Many US amateurs are willing to provide the required US
mailing address.
The mailing address could also be a PO box or mail forwarding service as
long as the FCC can send you documents that aren't returned as undelivered.

§97.23 Mailing address.
Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing
address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur
service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail
delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station
license or suspension of the operator license may result when
correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the
grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.
--
Mouse.
Where Morse meets House.
Brian Reay
2017-06-05 12:03:55 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Spike, if someone really wanted to circumvent the UK exam system, they
could far more easily take the US exams in the UK, without incurring
the expense of travelling to Ireland, and still obtain the same UK
reciprocal licence. Plus, the US exam fee is only about £10. The US
licence (or license I should say) is free and they can choose a
callsign. Many US amateurs are willing to provide the required US
mailing address.
The mailing address could also be a PO box or mail forwarding service as
long as the FCC can send you documents that aren't returned as undelivered.
§97.23 Mailing address.
Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing
address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur
service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail
delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station
license or suspension of the operator license may result when
correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the
grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.
True.
Spike
2017-06-12 07:41:35 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Spike, if someone really wanted to circumvent the UK exam system, they
could far more easily take the US exams in the UK, without incurring
the expense of travelling to Ireland, and still obtain the same UK
reciprocal licence. Plus, the US exam fee is only about £10. The US
licence (or license I should say) is free and they can choose a
callsign. Many US amateurs are willing to provide the required US
mailing address.
The mailing address could also be a PO box or mail forwarding service as
long as the FCC can send you documents that aren't returned as undelivered.
The massive point that Reay has missed is that the US system is not part
of the HAREC scheme, and while passing the US exam might get you a UK
Full (Reciprocal) Licence it does not have the portability of the HAREC.
Hence, the IRTS exam pass imparts far more utility that a US pass - even
that of a codeless Extra.
--
Spike
Brian Reay
2017-06-12 08:18:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Spike
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Spike, if someone really wanted to circumvent the UK exam system,
they could far more easily take the US exams in the UK, without
incurring the expense of travelling to Ireland, and still obtain the
same UK reciprocal licence. Plus, the US exam fee is only about £10.
The US licence (or license I should say) is free and they can choose
a callsign. Many US amateurs are willing to provide the required US
mailing address.
The mailing address could also be a PO box or mail forwarding service
as long as the FCC can send you documents that aren't returned as
undelivered.
The massive point that Reay has missed is that the US system is not part
of the HAREC scheme, and while passing the US exam might get you a UK
Full (Reciprocal) Licence it does not have the portability of the HAREC.
Hence, the IRTS exam pass imparts far more utility that a US pass - even
that of a codeless Extra.
Oh dear. The US licence (or license perhaps) is accepted in all the
countries which accept HAREC as the latter is part of CEPT which the US
licence has been acknowledged by.

You really should check your facts before trying to advise others on
such things.
--
Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
A. non Eyemouse
2017-07-23 09:35:03 UTC
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Post by Spike
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
Just looking at the recently issued OFCOM guidance

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0026/82637/amateur_radio_licence_guidance_for_licensees.pdf

2.29 would suggest that as Ireland is a participant in TR 61-02 then
this would be a UK Amateur Radio (Full) licence rather than a Full
(Temporary Reciprocal) licence.

But http://www.erodocdb.dk/docs/doc98/official/pdf/TR6102.pdf says the
UK will issue a Full(reciprocal).

So no mention of reciprocal in the latest OFCOM guidance.
--
Mouse.
Where Morse meets House.
Brian Reay
2017-07-23 09:42:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Spike
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
Just looking at the recently issued OFCOM guidance
https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0026/82637/amateur_radio_licence_guidance_for_licensees.pdf
2.29 would suggest that as Ireland is a participant in TR 61-02 then
this would be a UK Amateur Radio (Full) licence rather than a Full
(Temporary Reciprocal) licence.
But http://www.erodocdb.dk/docs/doc98/official/pdf/TR6102.pdf says the
UK will issue a Full(reciprocal).
So no mention of reciprocal in the latest OFCOM guidance.
Yawn, another one who needs to join Spike's club for those needing to
get a life.
--
Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
Spike
2017-07-23 10:59:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Spike
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
Just looking at the recently issued OFCOM guidance
https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0026/82637/amateur_radio_licence_guidance_for_licensees.pdf
2.29 would suggest that as Ireland is a participant in TR 61-02 then
this would be a UK Amateur Radio (Full) licence rather than a Full
(Temporary Reciprocal) licence.
This document:

http://www.erodocdb.dk/doks/implement_doc_adm.aspx?docid=1803

...states that Ireland implemented TR 61-02 in 2009.
Post by A. non Eyemouse
But http://www.erodocdb.dk/docs/doc98/official/pdf/TR6102.pdf says the
UK will issue a Full(reciprocal).
So no mention of reciprocal in the latest OFCOM guidance.
Not for participating countries at least.

I'll take all that guff about 'reciprocal' out of the info.

This makes it even more sensible to avoid the UK's three-ring-circus
route to a Full licence.
--
Spike
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