Discussion:
IRISH AMATEUR RADIO EXAM NEXT MONTH
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mw/3/
2017-05-21 13:46:03 UTC
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The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.

If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)

Closing date for applications to sit the exam is 12th June 2017.

For more on this see http://www.irts.ie/cgi/st.cgi?applying
Brian Reay
2017-05-21 14:33:25 UTC
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Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen- unless the countries allow it.

This has been raised before, even Spike was forced to admit it was the
case.

You really should learn the rules Paul before offering bad advice.
--
Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
A. non Eyemouse
2017-05-21 14:50:35 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen- unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?

Could you, for example, use a US license in other countries if you're
not a US citizen?
--
Mouse.
Where Morse meets House.
Brian Reay
2017-05-21 16:13:54 UTC
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Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen- unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
No.

Why would it be?
--
Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
A. non Eyemouse
2017-05-21 17:08:28 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen- unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
No.
Why would it be?
So it's a general condition for a HAREC?

So how about my second question which vanished from your reply -
Could you, for example, use a US license in other countries if you're
not a US citizen?
--
Mouse.
Where Morse meets House.
Brian Reay
2017-05-21 21:40:53 UTC
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Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen- unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
No.
Why would it be?
So it's a general condition for a HAREC?
So how about my second question which vanished from your reply -
Could you, for example, use a US license in other countries if you're
not a US citizen?
You are confusing HAREC, which relates to obtaining a licence in another
country using a exam result from one where you've passed and exam and
using a license you hold while travelling- ie reciprocal operating. They
are not the same nor are they covered by the same agreements- or
sections of agreements perhaps.

The US applies CEPT as regards operating but not HAREC as regards
issuing licences or issuing HAREC certificates. Some countries,
including the UK, will issue a reciprocal licence (not to be confused
with allowing reciprocal operating) on presentation of a US Extra (or
Advanced) but that is entirely up to them- it isn't part of HAREC or CEPT.

I suggest you read up on the subject- you seem to be 'confused'.
--
Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
Fred Roberts
2017-05-22 08:52:00 UTC
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Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can 1. apply for an Irish licence from
COMREG (www.comreg.ie) 2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM
(www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen- unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
He's talking nonsense as usual, he just doesn't like anyone avoiding his
three ring circus.
--
The maths teacher broke down in tears at the North West Wiltshire
Magistrates’ Court
Spike
2017-05-22 09:07:22 UTC
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Post by Fred Roberts
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can 1. apply for an Irish licence from
COMREG (www.comreg.ie) 2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM
(www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen - unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
He's talking nonsense as usual, he just doesn't like anyone avoiding his
three ring circus.
Reay ignores himself - remember how many times he's bragged of M3s
getting the equivalent of a Full licence while abroad even if the
countries involved don't allow it?
--
Spike
Brian Reay
2017-05-22 09:19:02 UTC
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Post by Spike
Post by Fred Roberts
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can 1. apply for an Irish licence from
COMREG (www.comreg.ie) 2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM
(www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen - unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
He's talking nonsense as usual, he just doesn't like anyone avoiding
his three ring circus.
Reay ignores himself - remember how many times he's bragged of M3s
getting the equivalent of a Full licence while abroad even if the
countries involved don't allow it?
How would they get them if the countries involved didn't allow it?

As usual you are letting the 'red mist' interfere with your (limited)
thinking ability.

If you don't believe it happens, asked Frank to check the back issues of
the CDXC Magazine, it has been reported in there a couple of times.
(This assumes Frank reads the magazine, I rather doubt he has any real
interest in amateur radio.)
--
Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
Stephen Thomas Cole
2017-06-03 12:28:00 UTC
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Post by Brian Reay
Post by Spike
Post by Fred Roberts
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Post by Brian Reay
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can 1. apply for an Irish licence from
COMREG (www.comreg.ie) 2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM
(www.ofcom.co.uk)
But you can't use it in other countries, unless you are an Irish
citizen - unless the countries allow it.
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
He's talking nonsense as usual, he just doesn't like anyone avoiding
his three ring circus.
Reay ignores himself - remember how many times he's bragged of M3s
getting the equivalent of a Full licence while abroad even if the
countries involved don't allow it?
How would they get them if the countries involved didn't allow it?
As usual you are letting the 'red mist' interfere with your (limited)
thinking ability.
If you don't believe it happens, asked Frank to check the back issues of
the CDXC Magazine, it has been reported in there a couple of times.
(This assumes Frank reads the magazine, I rather doubt he has any real
interest in amateur radio.)
It also assumes that Frank Hunter GI4NKB can read.
--
STC / M0TEY /
http://twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Fred Roberts
2017-05-22 09:20:41 UTC
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Post by Spike
Post by Fred Roberts
Post by A. non Eyemouse
Is that rule specific to Ireland/COMREG?
He's talking nonsense as usual, he just doesn't like anyone
avoiding his three ring circus.
Reay ignores himself - remember how many times he's bragged of M3s
getting the equivalent of a Full licence while abroad even if the
countries involved don't allow it?
Reay only posts to cause strife, the man is an idiot. I have no doubt
that as we speak he's on a one man email crusade to image hosting sites,
ISP's, COMREG, OFCOM et al. This is time that would be better spent
studying for his intermediate licence IMO.
--
The maths teacher broke down in tears at the North West Wiltshire
Magistrates’ Court
Spike
2017-05-22 07:21:54 UTC
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Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
Closing date for applications to sit the exam is 12th June 2017.
For more on this see http://www.irts.ie/cgi/st.cgi?applying
=====

The IRTS HAREC exam has it all: far less bureaucracy than the UK, no
construction projects, no books to buy, prospective candidates can study
at home, one single exam of 60 questions. Take the club-based
5wpm and get a swanky two-letter EI call.

OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM

This involves pre-booking a place for the Irish ComReg exam, held twice
a year in Dublin (but see below). Note that this is a HAREC exam, and
not specifically an exam for an Irish licence. These usually take place
in April/June and October/December. Places are limited so making a
booking as early as possible is advisable. However, the IRTS web site
notes that "The examination is usually held in the ComReg Offices in
Dublin but, where the numbers warrant it, examinations can be held at
other centres". The exam fee is 50 euro (concessions are 25 euro), and much
useful exam-related material is available from IRTS. A sample
60-question, two-hour paper is also available on the IRTS web site by
following the links:

See http://www.irts.ie/exam for details about the exam, how to enter plus
links to the syllabus, course guide and other study material.

A HAREC will be awarded on the strength of a pass (60 percent correct
answers in each of the two sections), which can then be used to obtain a
UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence under the HAREC arrangement. Many other
countries belong to the HAREC scheme.

There is no accompanying compulsory Morse test or Morse Appreciation, and no
projects or construction work is required. Note that if you want a
two-letter (CEPT Class 1) EI call (see below), a pass in a club-based
5wpm Morse test is necessary.


TRAVELLING & COSTS

You will need to appear at the ComReg offices in Dublin at the
appropriate time, and there will be costs associated with that. Perhaps
the easiest and most direct route is to fly to Dublin; you will need to
cost travel from your nearest suitable airport, and determine the airfare.
For example, London Heathrow to Dublin can cost in the region of GBPS 89 at
for a pre-booked flight at about 0930, but this can be reduced by
travelling earlier in the day, travelling from a local airport, or not
taking up flight extras that add to the cost.

From Dublin, you will need to travel to the city centre. This is well
organised, fast, and inexpensive. Dublin Bus offers an express AirLink
service (route 747) every 10 minutes at peak times to the city centre
and bus station for 6 euro single or 10 euro return (but check for
latest fares). This service uses the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid the
city traffic and can
reach the city centre in minutes.

Dublin city centre has many restaurants and places to eat where suitable
refreshments can be purchased.

Another possible route is to travel to Belfast, stay overnight, and
travel by train to Dublin. This has not been costed, but would have the
advantage of breaking the journey into two parts. Belfast is a very
modern city and has a lively group of Amateurs who would doubtless make
you welcome.


NOTES

[] One does not need to be a resident or have an address in the Irish
Republic in order to be awarded an EI licence.
[] All EI licences grant full privileges, and enables operation outside
EI/UK under CEPT or other reciprocal arrangements.
[] EI does not issue any subsets of its main licence in the manner of
the UK.
[] The lifetime EI licence has a once-only cost of 125 euro (circa GBPS
100), and needs to be revalidated (free) every five years. Any postal
address is acceptable for this.

[] A UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence has some limitations, such as not
qualifying for operating either /MM or abroad under CEPT, the
supervision of a non-licensed person operating one's station, holding a
club licence, or (possibly, clarification sought)) obtaining a
reciprocal licence under a UK/foreign agreement where HARECs are not
accepted (see below). For everyday use within the UK it is
indistinguishable over the air from any other Full licence. Some of
these limitations can be avoided by taking out an EI call. About 700 UK
Full (Reciprocal) licenses are currently issue.

The HAREC/CEPT/Reciprocal arrangements are not necessarily clear or
straightforward in all cases, but the thrust of this document is the
issue of a UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence. Anyone wishing to use such
arrangements will need to determine the details for their particular
country of operation, or check whether such use would fall under the
purview of an EI licence.


FINALLY

The UK Full (Reciprocal) licence is indistinguishable from any other UK
Full licence over the air. Do the 5wpm in Eire and get a swanky
two-letter Irish call as well. It's also a licence for life. Validation
is every five years to any postal address in the world.

Any individual intending to take advantage of this route should
determine for themselves whether it is appropriate for their own needs,
what the likely costs will be for their particular situation, and the
suitability of the Full (Reciprocal) Licence for their particular
circumstances.
--
Spike
Jim GM4DHJ ...
2017-05-22 08:09:19 UTC
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Permalink
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Post by Spike
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
Closing date for applications to sit the exam is 12th June 2017.
For more on this see http://www.irts.ie/cgi/st.cgi?applying
=====
The IRTS HAREC exam has it all: far less bureaucracy than the UK, no
construction projects, no books to buy, prospective candidates can study
at home, one single exam of 60 questions. Take the club-based
5wpm and get a swanky two-letter EI call.
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
This involves pre-booking a place for the Irish ComReg exam, held twice
a year in Dublin (but see below). Note that this is a HAREC exam, and
not specifically an exam for an Irish licence. These usually take place
in April/June and October/December. Places are limited so making a
booking as early as possible is advisable. However, the IRTS web site
notes that "The examination is usually held in the ComReg Offices in
Dublin but, where the numbers warrant it, examinations can be held at
other centres". The exam fee is 50 euro (concessions are 25 euro), and much
useful exam-related material is available from IRTS. A sample
60-question, two-hour paper is also available on the IRTS web site by
See http://www.irts.ie/exam for details about the exam, how to enter plus
links to the syllabus, course guide and other study material.
A HAREC will be awarded on the strength of a pass (60 percent correct
answers in each of the two sections), which can then be used to obtain a
UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence under the HAREC arrangement. Many other
countries belong to the HAREC scheme.
There is no accompanying compulsory Morse test or Morse Appreciation, and no
projects or construction work is required. Note that if you want a
two-letter (CEPT Class 1) EI call (see below), a pass in a club-based 5wpm
Morse test is necessary.
TRAVELLING & COSTS
You will need to appear at the ComReg offices in Dublin at the
appropriate time, and there will be costs associated with that. Perhaps
the easiest and most direct route is to fly to Dublin; you will need to
cost travel from your nearest suitable airport, and determine the airfare.
For example, London Heathrow to Dublin can cost in the region of GBPS 89 at
for a pre-booked flight at about 0930, but this can be reduced by
travelling earlier in the day, travelling from a local airport, or not
taking up flight extras that add to the cost.
From Dublin, you will need to travel to the city centre. This is well
organised, fast, and inexpensive. Dublin Bus offers an express AirLink
service (route 747) every 10 minutes at peak times to the city centre
and bus station for 6 euro single or 10 euro return (but check for
latest fares). This service uses the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid the city
traffic and can
reach the city centre in minutes.
Dublin city centre has many restaurants and places to eat where suitable
refreshments can be purchased.
Another possible route is to travel to Belfast, stay overnight, and
travel by train to Dublin. This has not been costed, but would have the
advantage of breaking the journey into two parts. Belfast is a very modern
city and has a lively group of Amateurs who would doubtless make you
welcome.
NOTES
[] One does not need to be a resident or have an address in the Irish
Republic in order to be awarded an EI licence.
[] All EI licences grant full privileges, and enables operation outside
EI/UK under CEPT or other reciprocal arrangements.
[] EI does not issue any subsets of its main licence in the manner of the
UK.
[] The lifetime EI licence has a once-only cost of 125 euro (circa GBPS
100), and needs to be revalidated (free) every five years. Any postal
address is acceptable for this.
[] A UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence has some limitations, such as not
qualifying for operating either /MM or abroad under CEPT, the
supervision of a non-licensed person operating one's station, holding a
club licence, or (possibly, clarification sought)) obtaining a
reciprocal licence under a UK/foreign agreement where HARECs are not
accepted (see below). For everyday use within the UK it is
indistinguishable over the air from any other Full licence. Some of
these limitations can be avoided by taking out an EI call. About 700 UK
Full (Reciprocal) licenses are currently issue.
The HAREC/CEPT/Reciprocal arrangements are not necessarily clear or
straightforward in all cases, but the thrust of this document is the
issue of a UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence. Anyone wishing to use such
arrangements will need to determine the details for their particular
country of operation, or check whether such use would fall under the
purview of an EI licence.
FINALLY
The UK Full (Reciprocal) licence is indistinguishable from any other UK
Full licence over the air. Do the 5wpm in Eire and get a swanky
two-letter Irish call as well. It's also a licence for life. Validation
is every five years to any postal address in the world.
Any individual intending to take advantage of this route should
determine for themselves whether it is appropriate for their own needs,
what the likely costs will be for their particular situation, and the
suitability of the Full (Reciprocal) Licence for their particular
circumstances.
Spike
sounds like a nice trip and a good way to avoid being one of reays dreaded
hammy mens ......I would sail to Belfast from Cairnryan and then down to
Dublin.....always wanted to visit O'Connell street anyway ....
Stephen Thomas Cole
2017-06-03 12:28:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by Spike
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
Closing date for applications to sit the exam is 12th June 2017.
For more on this see http://www.irts.ie/cgi/st.cgi?applying
=====
The IRTS HAREC exam has it all: far less bureaucracy than the UK, no
construction projects, no books to buy, prospective candidates can study
at home, one single exam of 60 questions. Take the club-based
5wpm and get a swanky two-letter EI call.
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
This involves pre-booking a place for the Irish ComReg exam, held twice
a year in Dublin (but see below). Note that this is a HAREC exam, and
not specifically an exam for an Irish licence. These usually take place
in April/June and October/December. Places are limited so making a
booking as early as possible is advisable. However, the IRTS web site
notes that "The examination is usually held in the ComReg Offices in
Dublin but, where the numbers warrant it, examinations can be held at
other centres". The exam fee is 50 euro (concessions are 25 euro), and much
useful exam-related material is available from IRTS. A sample
60-question, two-hour paper is also available on the IRTS web site by
See http://www.irts.ie/exam for details about the exam, how to enter plus
links to the syllabus, course guide and other study material.
A HAREC will be awarded on the strength of a pass (60 percent correct
answers in each of the two sections), which can then be used to obtain a
UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence under the HAREC arrangement. Many other
countries belong to the HAREC scheme.
There is no accompanying compulsory Morse test or Morse Appreciation, and no
projects or construction work is required. Note that if you want a
two-letter (CEPT Class 1) EI call (see below), a pass in a club-based
5wpm Morse test is necessary.
TRAVELLING & COSTS
You will need to appear at the ComReg offices in Dublin at the
appropriate time, and there will be costs associated with that. Perhaps
the easiest and most direct route is to fly to Dublin; you will need to
cost travel from your nearest suitable airport, and determine the airfare.
For example, London Heathrow to Dublin can cost in the region of GBPS 89 at
for a pre-booked flight at about 0930, but this can be reduced by
travelling earlier in the day, travelling from a local airport, or not
taking up flight extras that add to the cost.
From Dublin, you will need to travel to the city centre. This is well
organised, fast, and inexpensive. Dublin Bus offers an express AirLink
service (route 747) every 10 minutes at peak times to the city centre
and bus station for 6 euro single or 10 euro return (but check for
latest fares). This service uses the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid the
city traffic and can
reach the city centre in minutes.
Dublin city centre has many restaurants and places to eat where suitable
refreshments can be purchased.
Another possible route is to travel to Belfast, stay overnight, and
travel by train to Dublin. This has not been costed, but would have the
advantage of breaking the journey into two parts. Belfast is a very
modern city and has a lively group of Amateurs who would doubtless make
you welcome.
NOTES
[] One does not need to be a resident or have an address in the Irish
Republic in order to be awarded an EI licence.
[] All EI licences grant full privileges, and enables operation outside
EI/UK under CEPT or other reciprocal arrangements.
[] EI does not issue any subsets of its main licence in the manner of
the UK.
[] The lifetime EI licence has a once-only cost of 125 euro (circa GBPS
100), and needs to be revalidated (free) every five years. Any postal
address is acceptable for this.
[] A UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence has some limitations, such as not
qualifying for operating either /MM or abroad under CEPT, the
supervision of a non-licensed person operating one's station, holding a
club licence, or (possibly, clarification sought)) obtaining a
reciprocal licence under a UK/foreign agreement where HARECs are not
accepted (see below). For everyday use within the UK it is
indistinguishable over the air from any other Full licence. Some of
these limitations can be avoided by taking out an EI call. About 700 UK
Full (Reciprocal) licenses are currently issue.
The HAREC/CEPT/Reciprocal arrangements are not necessarily clear or
straightforward in all cases, but the thrust of this document is the
issue of a UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence. Anyone wishing to use such
arrangements will need to determine the details for their particular
country of operation, or check whether such use would fall under the
purview of an EI licence.
FINALLY
The UK Full (Reciprocal) licence is indistinguishable from any other UK
Full licence over the air. Do the 5wpm in Eire and get a swanky
two-letter Irish call as well. It's also a licence for life. Validation
is every five years to any postal address in the world.
Any individual intending to take advantage of this route should
determine for themselves whether it is appropriate for their own needs,
what the likely costs will be for their particular situation, and the
suitability of the Full (Reciprocal) Licence for their particular
circumstances.
#mental
--
STC / M0TEY /
http://twitter.com/ukradioamateur
J1MBO ...
2017-06-03 12:38:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by Stephen Thomas Cole
Post by Spike
Post by mw/3/
The Irish amateur radio exam takes place next month.
If you sit and pass this exam - you can get a HAREC from COMREG
and with that document you can
1. apply for an Irish licence from COMREG (www.comreg.ie)
2. apply for a Full licence from OFCOM (www.ofcom.co.uk)
Closing date for applications to sit the exam is 12th June 2017.
For more on this see http://www.irts.ie/cgi/st.cgi?applying
=====
The IRTS HAREC exam has it all: far less bureaucracy than the UK, no
construction projects, no books to buy, prospective candidates can study
at home, one single exam of 60 questions. Take the club-based
5wpm and get a swanky two-letter EI call.
OBTAINING A UK FULL (RECIPROCAL) LICENCE VIA A SINGLE EXAM
This involves pre-booking a place for the Irish ComReg exam, held twice
a year in Dublin (but see below). Note that this is a HAREC exam, and
not specifically an exam for an Irish licence. These usually take place
in April/June and October/December. Places are limited so making a
booking as early as possible is advisable. However, the IRTS web site
notes that "The examination is usually held in the ComReg Offices in
Dublin but, where the numbers warrant it, examinations can be held at
other centres". The exam fee is 50 euro (concessions are 25 euro), and much
useful exam-related material is available from IRTS. A sample
60-question, two-hour paper is also available on the IRTS web site by
See http://www.irts.ie/exam for details about the exam, how to enter plus
links to the syllabus, course guide and other study material.
A HAREC will be awarded on the strength of a pass (60 percent correct
answers in each of the two sections), which can then be used to obtain a
UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence under the HAREC arrangement. Many other
countries belong to the HAREC scheme.
There is no accompanying compulsory Morse test or Morse Appreciation, and no
projects or construction work is required. Note that if you want a
two-letter (CEPT Class 1) EI call (see below), a pass in a club-based
5wpm Morse test is necessary.
TRAVELLING & COSTS
You will need to appear at the ComReg offices in Dublin at the
appropriate time, and there will be costs associated with that. Perhaps
the easiest and most direct route is to fly to Dublin; you will need to
cost travel from your nearest suitable airport, and determine the airfare.
For example, London Heathrow to Dublin can cost in the region of GBPS 89 at
for a pre-booked flight at about 0930, but this can be reduced by
travelling earlier in the day, travelling from a local airport, or not
taking up flight extras that add to the cost.
From Dublin, you will need to travel to the city centre. This is well
organised, fast, and inexpensive. Dublin Bus offers an express AirLink
service (route 747) every 10 minutes at peak times to the city centre
and bus station for 6 euro single or 10 euro return (but check for
latest fares). This service uses the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid the
city traffic and can
reach the city centre in minutes.
Dublin city centre has many restaurants and places to eat where suitable
refreshments can be purchased.
Another possible route is to travel to Belfast, stay overnight, and
travel by train to Dublin. This has not been costed, but would have the
advantage of breaking the journey into two parts. Belfast is a very
modern city and has a lively group of Amateurs who would doubtless make
you welcome.
NOTES
[] One does not need to be a resident or have an address in the Irish
Republic in order to be awarded an EI licence.
[] All EI licences grant full privileges, and enables operation outside
EI/UK under CEPT or other reciprocal arrangements.
[] EI does not issue any subsets of its main licence in the manner of
the UK.
[] The lifetime EI licence has a once-only cost of 125 euro (circa GBPS
100), and needs to be revalidated (free) every five years. Any postal
address is acceptable for this.
[] A UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence has some limitations, such as not
qualifying for operating either /MM or abroad under CEPT, the
supervision of a non-licensed person operating one's station, holding a
club licence, or (possibly, clarification sought)) obtaining a
reciprocal licence under a UK/foreign agreement where HARECs are not
accepted (see below). For everyday use within the UK it is
indistinguishable over the air from any other Full licence. Some of
these limitations can be avoided by taking out an EI call. About 700 UK
Full (Reciprocal) licenses are currently issue.
The HAREC/CEPT/Reciprocal arrangements are not necessarily clear or
straightforward in all cases, but the thrust of this document is the
issue of a UK Full (Reciprocal) Licence. Anyone wishing to use such
arrangements will need to determine the details for their particular
country of operation, or check whether such use would fall under the
purview of an EI licence.
FINALLY
The UK Full (Reciprocal) licence is indistinguishable from any other UK
Full licence over the air. Do the 5wpm in Eire and get a swanky
two-letter Irish call as well. It's also a licence for life. Validation
is every five years to any postal address in the world.
Any individual intending to take advantage of this route should
determine for themselves whether it is appropriate for their own needs,
what the likely costs will be for their particular situation, and the
suitability of the Full (Reciprocal) Licence for their particular
circumstances.
#mental
STC / M0TEY /
best doing it in three easy stages .......

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